Category Archives: Cloud Computing

Announcing “UWPDesktop” NuGet Package Version 14393

The UWPDesktop NuGet package is here to improve the developer experience with Visual Studio when walking along the Desktop Bridge.

The Desktop Bridge allows you to call UWP APIs directly from your WinForms, WPF or VB application. You can use APIs such as Live tiles, notifications, App Services and many more!

Previously, calling UWP APIs from a converted app was a confusing process. You had to find and reference the right .dll or .winmd, and it often wasn’t obvious which one to choose.

For example, to use “await” on UWP types, you had to reference the System.Runtime.WindowsRuntime.dll (c:Program Files (x86)Reference AssembliesMicrosoftFramework.NETCorev4.5
System.Runtime.WindowsRuntime.dll), which was actually from Windows 8.1 and therefore only worked in conjunction with “facadewindows.winmd” (c:Program Files (x86)Windows Kits10UnionMetadataFacadeWindows.WinMD).


AppServiceConnectionStatus status = await connection.OpenAsync();

Confusing, right? The new way is much simpler – just include the latest UWPDesktop NuGet package to your project, and you’re ready to call any supported UWP API without needing additional references.

You have two options for installing the package:

  1. In Visual Studio, right-click on your project, select “Manage NuGet Packages,” and search for and install the UWPDesktop package (as shown in the screenshot below):



  2. Use the Package Manager Console

Install-Package UwpDesktop

Warnings for unsupported UWP APIs

Not all modern APIs can be called directly from your desktop application; for example, you still can’t use XAML or SecondaryTile in your WinForms app. The UWPDesktop NuGet package makes your life easier by raising a warning if you try and call an unsupported API.

For more information and to learn more about the UWPDesktop NuGet package and Desktop Bridge, check out the resources below.

Resources

Microsoft Office 2010
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Go! With Microsoft Office 2010, Vol. 1, And Student Videos (Amazon) Amazon Logo

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Microsoft Office Home & Student 2010 - 3pc/1user [download] (Amazon) Amazon Logo

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Microsoft Office Home & Student 2010 Product Key Card- 1pc/1user [download] (Amazon) Amazon Logo

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New Perspectives On Microsoft Office 2010, First Course (Amazon) Amazon Logo

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Twitter loops all videos under 6.5 seconds as Vine shrivels into a camera

twitter-360 Twitter itself will take Vine’s place as a social network for short videos. To prep for tomorrow’s Vine shutdown and rebirth as Vine Camera, Twitter now automatically loops all videos shorter than 6.5 seconds. That’s not just clips posted from Vine Camera, but any tiny video, including ones saved from other apps like Snapchat. Twitter confirms to me that looping started… Read More
Microsoft Office 2010
Polycom Cx5000 Unified Conference Station For Microsoft Lync (Amazon) Amazon Logo

$4300.00



Buy Now

Microsoft Surface (32gb) (Amazon) Amazon Logo

$539.95



Buy Now

+ 11 others available from Amazon
Microsoft Office Home & Business 2010 - 2pc/1user (one Desktop And One Portable) (disc Version) (Amazon) Amazon Logo

$278.00

Buy Now
Microsoft Software Office Home And Business 2010 English Pc Attach Key Product Key Card For 1pc (Amazon) Amazon Logo

$219.69

Buy Now
Microsoft Office Home & Student 2010 - 3pc/1user (disc Version) (Amazon) Amazon Logo

$179.99

Buy Now
Microsoft Office Home & Business 2010 Product Key Card- 1pc/1user [download] (Amazon) Amazon Logo

$150.09

Buy Now
Go! With Microsoft Office 2010, Vol. 1, And Student Videos (Amazon) Amazon Logo

$128.49



Buy Now

Microsoft Office Home & Student 2010 - 3pc/1user [download] (Amazon) Amazon Logo

$124.99

Buy Now
Microsoft Office Home & Student 2010 Product Key Card- 1pc/1user [download] (Amazon) Amazon Logo

$99.99

Buy Now
New Perspectives On Microsoft Office 2010, First Course (Amazon) Amazon Logo

$87.20



Buy Now

Microsoft Natural Ergonomic Desktop 7000 (Amazon) Amazon Logo

$81.78



Buy Now

Microsoft Office 2010: Introductory (shelly Cashman Series(r) Office 2010) (Amazon) Amazon Logo

$69.49



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Evernote attempts to simplify with its new iOS app

ios-v8-launch-hero-640x360 Did anyone really love the Evernote mobile app? No? Well, good news then: the company is giving it another crack today, introducing what it hopes will be a simpler, more efficient tool to help you record your ideas, as well as search through and organize your Evernote content. As a reminder, the earlier app was a bit busy. Spread across the top of the screen were posting shortcuts –… Read More

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Roku’s new app can replace its remote, help you find something to watch

roku-mobile-app_my-channels-bg Fresh on the heels of introducing new TV models at CES, and touting its 13 percent share of the smart TV market, Roku today is rolling out a revamped mobile application aimed at making it easier to access its most popular features, including search and the remote control, while also introducing a new way to find things to watch. The company has long offered a handy companion app that works… Read More

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A Harvard junior who received internship offers from Google, Apple, Facebook, and more shares her 7 tips to ace an interview

jessica_pointing_photo

Jessica Pointing knows how to interview.

The Harvard University junior received internship offers at companies including Google, Apple, Facebook, Microsoft, McKinsey, Bain, Goldman Sachs, and Morgan Stanley.

A computer science and physics major, she’s received offer letters for roles in software engineering, data science, product management, consulting, investment banking, trading, and quantitative finance.

How does she do it? She credits being prepared and relaxed with her string of successful interviews.

Pointing published her best interviewing tips on her blog, the Optimize Guide, which features educational and career advice for high school and college students. Business Insider has shared her tips below, with permission.

1. Do your homework

Pointing made sure to hit the books before interviewing.

“I treated the internship interviews as a class — I studied material from books and did practice problems before the test (a.k.a. the interview),” she writes. “There is usually a go-to book for each industry.” These books help prepare job candidates, covering likely interview topics and even featuring practice problems.

For example, for software engineering interviews, she recommends “Cracking the Coding Interview” by Gayle Laakmann McDowell, while people going for consulting gigs should brush up on “Case in Point” by Marc Cosentino.

2. Develop a structure for problem solving

The stress of interviewing can make it pretty easy to blank out when you’re speaking to a hiring manager.

That’s why Pointing says it’s important to adopt a problem-solving mindset.

Here’s the structure she used for answering questions in her software engineering interviews:

  • Repeat the question to make sure that you understood the question and have all the relevant details.
  • Clarify the function input and output.
  • Check assumptions.
  • Give an approach to solving the problem.
  • Discuss the tradeoffs of the approach.
  • Code the solution.
  • Test the solution with a normal test case.
  • Test the solution with some edge cases.

She also broke down the approach she uses for consulting interviews:

  • Repeat the question to make sure that you understood the question and have all the relevant details.
  • Explain the objectives of the case and ask if there are any more objectives.
  • Ask any clarifying questions.
  • Generate ideas and a solution.
  • Organize and structure the answer.
  • For calculations, give insights into what the calculated number means.
  • Summarize the case at the end.

“These structures ensure that I hit almost everything I need to mention for a successful interview,” Pointing says. “In consulting, giving insights into a number you just calculated separates a good candidate from a great candidate.”

3. Practice and strategize

“It is very important to practice in an interview setting before the interview,” Pointing says. “If your college offers mock interviews, take them! Some companies offer mock interviews too. There are other services out there, such as Refdash that give you free mock interviews. Do a practice interview at every opportunity.”

If at all possible, Pointing recommends scheduling your “dream interview” last. That way, all of your previous interviews can serve as practice sessions.

4. Have a backup plan

Interviews can be pretty stressful.

So how can you keep your cool when the stakes are high?

Pointing advises having a backup plan in mind. You should always have an alternative path to pursue if your job or internship opportunity falls through.

“If you are interviewing for the summer and you go into an interview with no plan for the summer, then you will probably be way more stressed,” Pointing says. “Instead, if you already have an offer or a vague idea of something you would do in the summer (e.g. travel), then the stakes for the interview aren’t as high. The more options you already have, the more relaxed you will be in the interview and the higher your chances are for the job.”

So take some pressure off yourself and make sure to sketch out a backup plan.

5. Invest time

The interviewing process isn’t just about setting time aside to talk to a bunch of hiring managers. You’ll need to devote time to reading, practicing, and perhaps even traveling.

“I traveled across the country more than six times in twelve weeks for my interviews, and spent approximately 80 hours in planes,” Pointing says. “Make sure you have enough time in your schedule to invest in your internship search process. You should dedicate a few hours each day practicing for interviews. I scheduled time in my calendar for interview practice for every morning (after my regular morning routine).”

6. Create a question bank

Pointing recommends that after each interview, job candidates write down interview questions and solutions, as well as their own strengths and areas they could improve on.

“In one of my software engineering interviews, I missed a particular data structure that would have allowed me to have given a more efficient solution, but I made a note of it, and in another interview later on, I ran into a question where I could use that data structure,” she says. “After doing enough cases and problems, you will start to recognize patterns and you will become more confident and quicker in solving problems.”

7. Don’t skim over behavioral questions

Don’t just focus on industry-specific questions. Pointing says that interviewees must also come prepared with answers for common behavioral questions.

“Behavioral questions usually fall under several categories: leadership, teamwork, challenges and successes,” she writes. “You should identify stories in your life that fall under each of those categories. You should also write down those stories and all the details. Writing down your answers to behavioral questions before the interview is important.”

SEE ALSO: An HBS alum explains why he walked away from what seemed like a dream job on Wall Street

SEE ALSO: 17 people who accomplished incredible things at a shockingly young age

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: The right questions to ask during a job interview — according to an expert

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There's used to be only one Chinese-made car you could buy in the US — and we drove it

Volvo S60 T5 Inscription China

I was a broken record. For years, I said that it would be impossible for Chinese carmakers to crack into the US market, following the example of the Japanese and the South Koreans.

I had good justification for this extreme view: there’s no room.

Simply put, there’s was no market share to take in the US. And the old game of coming in with a great car in a segment that had been neglected or abjured — fuel-sipping Hondas in the 1970s, reliable family sedans in the 1980s, small SUVs in the 1990s, hybrid drivetrains in the 2000s — wasn’t going to work.

Competing on price, as Hyundai and Kia had, wasn’t really an option, either, as all the automakers selling cars in America had greatly improved their offerings on that front. You no longer needed to spend very much to get a lot of car.

Then in the midst of the financial crisis, Ford decided to streamline itself and shed its premium brands.

Geely makes its move

Among these were Volvo — the no-nonsense, yet romantic Swedish brand beloved by Los Angeles hipsters and hidebound preppies. A rare opportunity presented itself to international carmakers with aims to enter the US market.

Auto brands almost never go up for sale. More often, they fade away — or are swiftly executed. When Ford was selling Volvo, GM was also trying to unload Hummer, Saturn, and Saab. 

Enter Geely, a major Chinese automaker that jumped at the chance to buy a luxury brand, paying almost $2 billion for it in 2010.

Since then, we’ve been waiting to see what a Chinese-built car from a Swedish brand would be like. When one finally landed on American shores, I was especially intrigued.

The long-wheel base S60 Inscription sedan was the only Chinese-made car on sale in America. But the Buick Envision arrived in 2016, and I drove it to Detroit, an nice big road trip that gave me the chance to get to know the vehicle better. Look for a review soon.

In any case, we sampled a 2016 S60 Inscription “Platinum” in 2015. Business Insider’s Ben Zhang lent an assist, driving it in sporty fashion, while I used the car as a limo to chauffeur around a bunch of tweenage friends of my daughter for a weekend.

We thought it as worth a look back, now that number of Chinese-made cars in the US market has doubled:

SEE ALSO: The XT5 is Cadillac’s hottest selling SUV — but it has just one problem

The S60 Inscription has a pleasing, unobtrusive stance that says, “I’m new” without saying “I’m not a Volvo.” The “Seashell Metallic” paint job also looked very much at home in the New Jersey suburbs.

Solid, simple, dependable. All very Volvo, right down to the fuss-free grille and the familiar Volvo badge. But not stodgy, either. The S60 has a more-or-less contemporary appearance, far sleeker than the brick-like Volvos of yore.

In case you thought it was a Toyota Camry.

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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Apple Music execs hate the word 'utility' — and it says a lot about what they're trying to build (AAPL)

jimmy iovineApple really, really doesn’t want people to think of Apple Music as a utility.

You might think its streaming service, which provides access to a vast catalog of music and playlists, is a handy internet utility. But you’d be wrong, according to Apple Music executives. Very wrong. 

“We’re fighting ‘free,’” Apple Music exec and music heavyweight Jimmy Iovine said Saturday at TCA, referencing the free tiers of competitors like Spotify and Pandora. “So a simple utility where, ‘here’s all the songs, here’s all the music, give me $10 and we’re cool,’ is not going to scale.”

That argument isn’t entirely sound. Spotify has over 40 million paying subscribers, as of September, and its future as a business isn’t going to hinge on the freeloaders. Same with Pandora, which is set to soon launch a premium on-demand tier. Paying customers will determine who wins and who dies in the music-streaming business, and Apple Music has 20 million of them as of December.

But Iovine’s broader point is that Apple Music has to set its brand apart.

Music is a commodity when every streaming service offers more or less the same catalog of songs and functions. “Apple Music” has to mean something to consumers. And defining what that “something” is may be the most pressing question for Apple as it tries to establish itself in the streaming music business.

Beyond personalization

In an interview with Complex published Monday, Apple Music’s content chief, Larry Jackson, outlined his initial goal with the product:

“Make something that’s the intersection of all things pop-culture. To make it more than just a utility. I like to think of it as a place where the best creative thinkers in music can congregate and come up with different ideas.”

There’s that word again: utility.

Utility is the enemy.

Competitors like Spotify, Amazon, and Pandora seems to be betting on their hyper-personalization to lift them out of the utility realm. Spotify, in particular, has had a cult hit with its Discover Weekly playlist, which gives you a fresh slate of songs every week aligned with your taste.

But Apple Music is going in a different direction. Apple has signed up some of the biggest names in music, from Drake to Taylor Swift, to make Apple Music less of song database and more of an artistic meeting of the minds — where Apple is intimately involved.

Here’s an example: Jackson himself co-wrote a 20-minute music video for Drake called “Please Forgive Me.” To do the video, Drake “uprooted his life to go to Africa for seven days in the middle of BET [Awards] week … All for an idea we had,” Jackson said.

That is much more than just a weeklong exclusive window for an album on Apple Music.

The Netflix playbook

Perhaps a better touchstone for understanding Apple Music’s vision isn’t its direct music competitors, but rather, Netflix.

Netflix began as a place you could watch an expansive catalog of movies and TV shows ( on DVD and later on streaming) that weren’t particularly exclusive to Netflix or infused with its brand. But Netflix has transitioned more and more toward producing its own original shows, moving up the content food chain. On the way, it has built a brand that is both distinctive and has mass appeal.

You could imagine a similar trajectory for Apple Music.

Iovine has said that Apple has “no interest in being a label,” citing the fact that labels “manage hundreds of groups.” “We don’t, nor could we,” he said.

But the role of the music label in the future is being questioned, especially since big artists like Frank Ocean, who works with Apple, are trying to extricate themselves from label deals. And perhaps Apple doesn’t need to step in and become Frank Ocean’s new label, but merely fulfill some of the functions the label once did, and let Ocean’s management team pick up the rest.

There is a common misconception that Netflix “makes” most of the shows it brands as Netflix originals. In fact, it only produces a small fraction of them, buying the rest from studios. Lionsgate, for instance, makes “Orange Is the New Black.” Netflix is moving toward producing more shows in its own studios, but the process has been a slow one.

Apple could ease into music in a similar way, branding releases and videos as Apple Music exclusives, but having each deal be crafted in different ways, based on the type of resources Apple could provide.

Regardless, all would all serve to build up Apple Music’s brand.

The stars

The Netflix analogy isn’t a perfect one.

Where Apple already seems to vary substantially from Netflix is in cultivating specific personalities. Netflix doesn’t have a roster of stars that are closely associated with the brand. Apple seems to be trying to create one already, especially with Taylor Swift and Drake. And it’s not just about their albums, but rather a whole host of creative endeavors, like the previously mentioned music video.

That mandate could even spread beyond music.

“At Apple Music, what we’re trying to create is an entire cultural, pop cultural experience, and that happens to include audio and video,” Iovine said Saturday. “If ‘South Park’ walks into my office, I am not going to say you’re not musicians, you know? We’re going to do whatever hits popular culture smack on the nose. We’re going to try.”

In 2016, Apple announced it would launch a video series based on the “Carpool Karaoke” sketches on James Corden’s “Late, Late Show.” The show does relate to music, but the draw is Corden’s personality, and the format he created. (It’s also not produced by Apple, but rather by CBS Television Studios).

If Apple can succeed in creating a compelling roster of stars associated with the Apple Music brand, that will be bad news for competitors. Sophisticated algorithms that learn listeners’ musical tastes are great for retaining loyal customers, but no streaming music service has yet figured out the most powerful sales pitch for attracting first-time users. 

 

SEE ALSO: Netflix climbs to an all-time high ahead of earnings

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: Here is the stunning $1.5 billion stadium being built for the Atlanta Falcons

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Sensitive access tokens and keys found in hundreds of Android apps

Many developers still embed sensitive access tokens and API keys into their mobile applications, putting data and other assets stored on various third-party services at risk.

A new study performed by cybersecurity firm Fallible on 16,000 Android applications revealed that about 2,500 had some type of secret credential hard-coded into them. The apps were scanned with an online tool released by the company in November.

Hard-coding access keys for third-party services into apps can be justified when the access they provide is limited in scope. However, in some cases, developers include keys that unlock access to sensitive data or systems that can be abused.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

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IDG Contributor Network: Linux use on Pornhub surged 14% in 2016

Linux use on Pornhub increased 14% in 2016

Pornhub is one of the preeminent porn sites on the web. Each year Pornhub releases a year in review post with anonymous details about the site’s users. More and more Linux users are visiting Pornhub, Linux saw an impressive 14% increase in traffic share in 2016.

Pornhub shared many anonymous details about its users in 2016 in a very long post on its site:

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

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The unseemly world of Darkweb marketplaces

The genesis of underground markets goes back to when communication used to take place via Internet Relay Chat channels. Fast forward to the 21st Century with the evolution of cryptocurrencies and anonymous communications the underground market ecosystem has evolved.

Underground markets offer a variety of services for cyber criminals to profit from, says Luis Mendieta, senior security researcher at Anomali. These forums offer items ranging from physical world items like drugs and weapons to digital world items such as spam/phishing delivery, exploit kit services, “Crypters”, “Binders”, custom malware development, zero-day exploits, and bulletproof hosting.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

(Insider Story)

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